Articles Tagged with Testimonials

Rule 206(4)-1 under the Investment Advisers Act, known as the “Marketing Rule,” becomes effective on May 4, 2021. Full details of the new rule and the related amendments to the Books and Records Rule and for ADV can be reviewed in the SEC’s adopting release. The new rule changes many aspects of the current guidance applicable to advertising by SEC-registered investment advisers, some of which is drawn from no-action letters and other informal releases. Advisers must come into compliance with the new rule within eighteen months of the effective date or by November 4, 2022. Firms may choose to come into compliance at any time between the effective date and the compliance date, but the SEC has warned that RIAs may not choose to implement parts of the new rules at different times. Rather, a firm must implement and be prepared to comply with the entirety of the new rule on a single date within the eighteen-month compliance period. The rule does not, on its face, apply to state-registered RIAs, who should continue to follow the rules applicable to the states in which they conduct business. Some state rules mirror or adopt the SEC advertising rules in some respects.

One of the most important changes relates to using what has historically been referred to as “testimonials,” or statements by clients regarding their experience with an adviser. The current rule 206(4)-1, titled “Advertisements by Investment Advisers,” states that any advertisement by an adviser that uses a “testimonial of any kind” is deemed fraudulent, deceptive or manipulative. Although “testimonial” is not defined in the current rule, the SEC consistently interpreted the term as a statement of a client’s experience with, or endorsement of, an investment adviser. Under the new rule, however, testimonials as traditionally understood are permitted as long as firms comply with a number of requirements. Continue reading ›

On November 4th, the SEC released for public comment proposed replacements to its decades-old advertising and cash solicitation rules. The proposed rules, which are accompanied by almost 500 pages of explanatory text, are now subject to the SEC’s “notice and comment” process, whereby interested persons will have 60 days to file comments to the SEC, after which time the SEC will likely issue final versions of the new rules. While the content of the final rules ultimately adopted by the SEC may differ substantially from the versions now being circulated, the current proposals are the most likely outcome at this point in time and offer valuable insight into the SEC’s thinking in this area.

According to the SEC, both the advertising and cash solicitation rules are ripe for updates and modernization as a result of “changes in technology, the expectations of investors seeking advisory services, and the evolution of industry practices.” Notably, the advertising rule (Advisers Act Rule 206(4)-1) has been largely untouched since its adoption in 1961. Likewise, the cash solicitation rule (Advisers Act Rule 206(4)-3) has not been amended since its adoption in 1979. In this installment of our blog, we will outline some of the more salient points of the SEC’s proposal to replace the advertising rule. Look for our discussion of the proposed cash solicitation rule amendment in an upcoming post.

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On July 10, 2018, the Securities and Exchange Commission published five Orders Instituting Administrative and Cease-and-Desist Proceedings against two registered investment advisers, three investment adviser representatives, and Leonard S. Schwartz, a marketing consultant.  The Orders allege that the respondents violated the Investment Advisers Act’s Testimonial Rule (275.206(4)-1(a)(1)).  The SEC also alleged that another investment advisory firm, Romano Brothers & Company (“Romano Brothers”), violated the Testimonial Rule by posting two videos on YouTube featuring client testimonials. The Testimonial Rule provides that investment advisers and their representatives are forbidden from publishing, circulating, or distributing advertising materials that directly or indirectly refer to client experiences about the investment adviser and its services. The SEC considers publication of client testimonials fraudulent because testimonials typically present a biased evaluation of an investment adviser’s services. Continue reading ›

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